Measurement and Estimation of Bicycle and Rider Physical Parameters


Summary

The purpose of this research is to establish methods for measuring and estimating the physical parameters of bicycles and bicycle riders necessary for simulating models of the bicycle-rider system.

Theme Bicycle Engineering Current Researchers Julie van Vlerken
Last Worked On August 2020 Past Researchers Noah Sanders, Chris Dembia
Collaborators Mont Hubbard, Ronald Hess, Chris Dembia, Arend Schwab, Jodi Kooijman

In [Moore2008] we developed and used a method for estimating the inertial properties of the bicycle and rider given simple geometric measurements. The rider method in [Moore2008] was formalized in [Moore2009] and combined with more accurate measures and estimates of the bicycle's physical parameters based on the methods used in [Kooijman2006]. We presented estimates of the physical parameters of several different styles of bicycles in [Moore2010] and compared their resulting dynamics. Then in [Moore2012] the prior work was further refined and included measurements of additional bicycles and a new method for estimating the rider's inertial parameters. The generalized human inertia estimation method used in [Moore2012] was published in [Dembia2015]. The software [Moore2011] used for the computations has been developed over the years and basic functionality is now available in a freely accessible web application:

Screenshot of the bicycle dynamics web app. Click the image to go to the app at https://bicycleparameters.herokuapp.com.

Funding

This material is partially based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0928339. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

References

[Kooijman2006]J. D. G. Kooijman. Experimental validation of a model for the motion of an uncontrolled bicycle. Master’s thesis, Delft University of Technology, 2006.
[Moore2008](1, 2) J. Moore and M. Hubbard, "Parametric Study of Bicycle Stability," in The Engineering of Sport 7, 2008, vol. 2, https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-2-287-99056-4_39.
[Moore2009]J. K. Moore, J. D. G. Kooijman, M. Hubbard, and A. L. Schwab, "A Method for Estimating Physical Properties of a Combined Bicycle and Rider," presented at the ASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, Aug. 2009, https://dx.doi.org/10.1115/DETC2009-86947.
[Moore2010]Jason K. Moore et al. An Accurate Method of Measuring and Comparing a Bicycle's Physical Parameters". In: Proceedings of Bicycle and Motorcycle Dynamics: Symposium on the Dynamics and Control of Single Track Vehicles. Delft, Netherlands, Oct. 2010.
[Moore2011]J. K. Moore, C. Dembia, O. Lee and N. Sanders, BicycleParameters: A Python library for bicycle parameter estimation and analysis. 2011. https://github.com/moorepants/BicycleParameters
[Moore2012](1, 2) Jason K. Moore. Human Control of a Bicycle". PhD thesis. Davis, CA: University of California, Davis, Aug. 2012. http://moorepants.github.io/dissertation
[Dembia2015]C. Dembia, J. K. Moore, and M. Hubbard, "An object oriented implementation of the Yeadon human inertia model," F1000Research, vol. 3, no. 233, Apr. 2015, https://dx.doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.5292.2.